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Learning Design
Ask employees where they learned how to do their job and the answer is usually some variation of “at work”. Studies like the one below usually identify “on-the-job experience” and “interaction with co-workers” as the main learning vehicles. Informal learning tends to focus on collaboration and knowledge exchange Although, training functions are coming around to...
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Dave Ferguson’s recent post on Bloom’s learning taxonomy (see Lovin’ Bloom) got me thinking about the value of learning taxonomies in learning and information design. Learning taxonomies attempt to break down and categorize types of learning to help designers (of instruction, information, education, performance) develop objectives and learning strategies best matched to the specific type...
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Overheard at a recent training conference… “I’d be more successful if I didn’t worry so much about needs assessment and just gave them good courses.  The business is moving too fast for a big study  The only ones complaining are the instructional design group” It was a conversation between training managers.  It’s only one conversation...
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Happy New Year!  In my last post (way back in 2008), I mentioned a range of ways Social Media can be used to support formal and informal learning.   One of those methods is to wrap social media tools around a job or workflow and structure them to support informal learning. Here I build on that...
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A few days ago Ron Wilkins referenced a report released from the  Corporate Leadership Council (CLC) asking CEOs which areas in their organizations would suffer the most in response to the current economic crisis.   Learning and Development was tagged as the #1 target for cutbacks at 38% of respondents.  Recruiting was second and IT was...
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In a recent post I mentioned there are alternatives to “rapid” e-learning that can be used to avoid the common present > ask-a-question >click next death march.  Rapid e-learning tools can certainly decrease the time it takes to develop e-learning, but in my experience they dramatically increase the time it takes for an employee to...
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The emergence of highly templated rapid e-learning tools and Learning Content Management Systems together with technical standards (SCORM) has been a mixed blessing. Improved efficiency but at what cost? These advances have clearly improved the efficiency of e-learning development (speed) and reduced the costs of development to make it easier for organizations to implement more...
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About the Blog

This blog contains perspectives on the issues that matter most in workplace learning and performance improvement.  It’s written by Tom Gram.

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Recent Posts

The Learning Design Sprint
August 16, 2018
Practice and the Development of Expertise (Part 3)
August 9, 2018
Practice and the Development of Expertise (Part 2)
August 6, 2018
Practice and the Development of Expertise (Part 1)
August 5, 2018
Learning, Technology and the Future of Work
June 10, 2018

Popular Posts from the Archive

Here are some popular posts from Tom’s former blog, Performance X Design. Some older posts contain inactive links and unedited formatting while they wait impatiently for him to update them.